About

Welcome to the website of Chris Fletcher.

Below are links to his writing elsewhere on the web.

Essays

The View from Inside Her Rectangle” @ 3:AM Magazine

“White-hot poker” is a hardboiled metaphor if I’ve ever heard one, and “jelly” is a pretty good follow-up. I’d say that Sarrazin made Anne sound Chandleresque, but Anne’s more French, more elliptical in her literalness. Similes are in short supply. Anne is the Philip Marlowe of metaphors. More…

On Inception by Christopher Nolan@ The Quarterly Conversation

Three nights ago, I read Mark Twain’s The Mysterious Stranger and Other Stories. When I finished it, I dropped the book into the gap between my bed and the wall and tried to forget I had read it. I couldn’t sleep when I finished it, and I can’t sleep now. After few nights of tossing and turning, I dredge it up, rip The Mysterious Stranger from the other stories, and throw the loose pages away. More…

Chris & Cronenberg @ The Quarterly Conversation

We heard the sound of someone moving around, but everyone in sight was made of either porcelain or plastic. Then a woman emerged from a room in the back (which I later saw was full of little arms, legs, and heads). She was talking, but not to us. More…

Book Reviews

Personae @ Music & Literature

Personae is less a novel in a fugue state than a novel-as-fugue, in the musical sense of the word—where a voice (or instrument) states the subject (or theme), another voice answers, and a conversation is had between them concerning the subject until yet another voice restates the subject. More…

Leaving the Atocha Station The Quarterly Conversation

Since Adam Gordon and Ben Lerner share some important similarities, it is tempting to say that the novel is not only about the way life and art have a habit of infecting each other but also an example of that infection. But we must be wary of such an interpretation: it would allow us to read the novel as a veiled autobiography, an “easy” first novel for a poet to write. More…

Kind One The Quarterly Conversation

Rather than propelling us through the narrative with the help of formal constraints, it presents us with five narrators telling parts of the same story. No one narrative is satisfying in itself but the combination leads to something like closure. The longest of these narratives, also entitled “Kind One,” is composed of Ginny’s memories of her life in Lancaster’s Paradise. The memories intersect each other, doubling back from time to time to recount the same events with a different focus. More…

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